Browse blow-up delivers an awkward epiphany

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Cost associated with Australian workers, carbon tax [e.g. The cost of the core refrigeration gas for the project has increased some 200%], uncertainty of royalties, inflation, delays created by green and red tape and of much smaller impact, the dollar value, have all added to the project cost estimate. As the recently reported coal miners and others have found, the cost of completing construction works in Australia has increased some 60% since 2007 - Although the Government vehemently deny this. It really matters not, regardless of how we package this delay, no matter how we deny the reality, the Australian Government, their union masters and the associated rules, standards and regulation have destroyed yet another source of Australian wealth; hopefully only until we have an election. Watch this space – the next will be car manufacturing, grimly holding out for an election but will it come in time?

"the next will be car manufacturing, grimly holding out for an election but will it come in time?" I'm not sure if your intention was humour but that was really funny.

The real problem, that off shore gas faces, is on shore shale gas. White Cliffs in NSW has a lot of it. However as you say, refrigeration costs are becoming staggering. The rubbish that we are subjected too, related to carbon tax, conveniently avoids anything to do with refrigeration.

Pity, because superconductivity is the way of the future, ah bugger it, lets buy a train and run it with windmills.

- 1 - Critically Federal and States dont work hand in hand as you explained clearly in the article “The premier factors undermining the MRRT” specially when it comes to build these infrastructures which would give Australia the edge over less developed environments, ports, rail etc...and I doubt the situation will change in the near future whether it is the current government or the coalition privatisation and user pay tactics.

- 2 - There are now even large divisions within the labor party itself regarding resource development and mining policies, it is a total mess.
Given our inability in policies development regarding adding value down processing and helping to create new infrastructures, ...apart from Colin Barnett efforts to refund royalties for the investments made in some of these areas, the furture looks grim and many speak with their feet.

..not mentioning the circus about the mining and carbon taxes making our policy makers looking more and more like Bruno the Questionable ruling over the kindgom of the walking backwards.

Everytimes something is needed in term of policy the media game transforms it into these gigantesques sculptures found in the old Staline Soviet places railway stations etc, it has to become a “World” supersize jumbo gizzmo, NBN VFT NDIS Gonski but the train is on a standstill in the station as someone has removed the rails down the track, just to go next door, the bills were not paid by the new private owner or the port competes with the one next door(1000km away).
Both side of politics almost walk backwards, the coalition a bit less, may be sideways, like passing the buck or refinancing some “clever” way but certainly nothing really intelligent otherwise it would be already under the “stoning type” media carnival.
...Meanwhile the actors of growth including SMEs paying the bills are speaking with their feet.

Yep

We don't need a manufacturing industry - resources will pay for all imports from food to cars.

Pig's derriere.

For manufacturing......
the future is very dark if we dont contemplate how the economy works and let vertical landing or vertical supply chain and excessive privatisation destroy the level playing field and when you add to it excessive wage increases then you get the sack(not downunder failure in politics is just merely very temporary) or it closes down.

On one side we can have Soviet style economics that produced million of unused shoes in the back of factories or we can have this great vertical supply chain and vertical landing kokoda tax room style a vertical ownership of the entire supply chain, the tourism agency, the cruiser, the hotel, the guide, the bus tour, the souvenir shop and the tourist gizzmos or Art making to prevent competition including talent skills and quality and other things playing their role in the market.
That is a simple analogy to the same reality manufacturing is facing although the mobile factury floor, robotics and supply chain are more sophisticated to detail in a couple of lines.

Just have to add that whether it is the state that muzzle the vertical chain or the private big boys that cheat on the tax differentials between countries and play the mobile factory floor game, it is just the same result and bad news if you ignore the warnings of not looking into it seriously.

Jacques Nasser the former CEO of Ford and Chairman of BHP and another Manufacturing CEO confirms this morning this posting, once the supply chain is gone you are gone, if you can't fix the supply chain then it will speak for you. Dont look at Ford or Holden assembler role without looking at the suppliers chain otherwise you are gone.

I think it's amusing that it's the aboriginals that'll miss out on employment given Labor's unions and the Greens obstructionism played a large part in it being shelved. I thought Labor/Greens were all about giving indigenous people opportunity. Who needs a job when you can have a soundbite in the constitution?

Jacques Nasser the former CEO of Ford and Chairman of BHP and another Manufacturing CEO confirmed this morning this posting, once the supply chain is gone you are gone, if you can't fix the supply chain then it will speak for you. Dont look at Ford or Holden assembler role without looking at the suppliers chain otherwise you are gone.
Jacques Nasser stopped short of saying Car manufacturing dowunder is gone, but just!