Toyota's hard brake was a long time coming

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Stephen, under the circumstances you quote, who can blame them for rushing to the exit. Surely. the Government should step in and sort things out. It can happen to other industries.

"In Toyota's case, its inability to talk to its own employees about restructuring workplace arrangements would have been a final, frustrating straw"

And made worse by the thought that it would have to... "sustain the existing components sector"

Vasso a bit hard for Toyota to believe that it would get any easier when the union went to court to prevent changes to the workplace agreement even being considered and the judge agreed with the union.I didnt hear Bill Shorten advising the union to back off.now the union will try and spin that it is all Tony Abbotts fault.In reality the choice was made by the 7 out of every 8 Australians buying a new car who chose an imported one in combination with the intransigent union.

Very sad to see on the TV news Shorten and Carr on their soapboxes proclaiming the closures are the fault of the Government when the inevitably and now reality has been apparent for such a long time.
They know better than that, but their convenient spineless politics blind them to a more constructive position. I can only hope that there are enough thinking Australians hearing this weasel talk to see through it.
Government is about hard decisions, and there is nothing hard about cutting cheques to prop up inefficient unprofitable industries which is all Labor seems to offer. It's hardly the answer and Australia is in for some tough times as we readjust to the new norms, and like it or not, the Government is making the correct calls.
Just been reading an article this am on 'The Conversation' site written by some pontificating armchair academics, followed by a cheer squad of comments bagging the Government for its "failings", yet, demonstrating their intellectual laziness, not one offers up any workable and practical alternatives.

I reiterate:

"In Toyota's case, its inability to talk to its own employees about restructuring workplace arrangements would have been a final, frustrating straw"

During my 27 years with Lend Lease's golden years, 11 years ago. The success was attributed to the strong management team, devotion by the workforce, both wages and staff and supported by the ACTU.

Today's industrial relations is a recipe for disaster. Albeit, I hear that SPC is beginning to breathe without the $25 million alm.