Adam Carr

Adam Carr is a leading economist in the Australian market. In addition to being a columnist with Eureka Report, he has worked with some of the world’s largest investment banks and financial intermediaries. Adam was also formerly an economic adviser with the Prime Minister's Department and Commonwealth Treasury.

Negative gearing has already been neutered

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In this low interest rate world, negative gearing isn't especially beneficial and messing with it won't fix the budget or improve housing affordability.

Seeing the wood for the oriental cypress trees

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It is telling that Australia's pessimism over the PBOC cutting the reserve requirement ratio isn't shared in China or elsewhere around the globe.

The cost of a bloated bureaucracy

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Now that the government has given up on any idea of fiscal restraint, it should start looking at the cost of administration.

Iron ore and the lessons of history

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If the iron ore price didn't cause an economic boom on the way up, why would it all of a sudden cause a slump on the way down?

It looks like the economy just moved up a gear

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Beyond the headlines and all the talk of doom and gloom, the Australian economy is actually on the up and up.

The real house price boom hasn’t even begun

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Many economics commentators appear to have fundamentally misunderstood the dynamics of the Australian property market.

Mario's victory in Europe

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In a sign the eurozone has turned a corner, the economy is growing, unemployment is falling and the money supply rate is increasing at the strongest pace since the GFC.

Now is not the time for tax reform talk

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Neither the current government nor the opposition are capable of a genuine discussion on tax reform.

The Fed and the ECB face off

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The expansionary monetary policies of the ECB and the Bank of Japan will make it more difficult for the Federal Reserve to achieve policy normalisation.

The US dollar – how high is too high?

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While the US dollar isn't particularly high relative to history, we are getting into dangerous territory and the trigger point for US action can't be far away.

What's the rates end game?

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The only way out of the mess created by unconventional monetary policies is for central banks to work in unison to normalise rates in a coordinated fashion.

Don't bank on a Fed rate rise this year

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In determining whether the Fed is running out of patience and keen to hike rates, investors need to ask themselves just one question: what's really changed?

Foreigners are not to blame for the unemployment 'crisis'

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There's no need to reduce the number of immigrants coming to Australia. Economic growth remains strong enough to create jobs, the real problem is with the data.

Is the Aussie bond bubble about to burst?

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The US Federal Reserve is the global rate setter, so whether the Reserve Bank cuts or holds, the implication for domestic rates is that the curve will continue to steepen.

A miracle! Or a crisis?

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The concern over rampant government spending is all an illusion. Australia has actually been in the clutches of a modest austerity program for the past two years.

China's rate cut won't spur growth

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The PBOC's recent rate moves will do little to fend off a hard landing, but then again China isn't actually confronting one.

How low will the RBA go?

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The market expects the official cash rate to be 50 basis points lower by the end of the year, but the window for a rate cut is actually quite narrow, for two reasons.

Australia has its head in the sand

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Forget dismal predictions of an impending downturn, we need to start focusing on the huge opportunities that exist in the rapidly expanding economies of Asia.

Either way, it’s a Greek tragedy

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There’s no silver lining, but staying in the eurozone and drastically cutting expenditure is the least painful route for Greek citizens.

A crude awakening for the oil market

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With oil prices driven more by changes in expectations about future market conditions than the fundamentals of supply and demand, expect the volatility to continue.

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