Adam Carr

Adam Carr is a leading economist in the Australian market. In addition to being a columnist with Eureka Report, he has worked with some of the world’s largest investment banks and financial intermediaries. Adam was also formerly an economic adviser with the Prime Minister's Department and Commonwealth Treasury.

The Fed’s rates feint will spur stocks in 2015

The money is on at least one US rate rise next year, but low inflation should price out a rate hike and spur a surge in equity markets.

The government must not shy away from fiscal repair

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The real issue plaguing the government isn't a decline in the terms of trade -- it's an unsustainable addiction to spending.

Rate cuts would send the wrong message

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A drop in consumer sentiment and a rise in the unemployment rate has fuelled Australia's economic pessimists, but there's more to the data than meets the eye.

Murray has got it wrong on bank capital

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Despite the noble rhetoric surrounding recommendations on bank capital, the Murray inquiry has failed to make a convincing case for change.

The great Australian lie

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Talk of an income recession is quite simply misguided. The bottom line is underlying economic growth is probably still rising at an above trend pace.

The RBA’s rates policy can’t hold for much longer

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The economy is either going into a downturn or a decent upswing, and a policy response will be needed soon.

How to read the US bond market's mixed signals

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Falling US bond yields have sparked talk of a slowdown in US growth, but there are several reasons why this view is misguided.

Will central banks help or harm us?

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The consequences of prolonging ultra-low interest rates to fend off the threat of deflation could be more harmful than deflation itself.

Why Europe is not Japan

Europe's problems are tiny in comparison to those of Japan. The region is not about to enter a 'lost decade'.

Don’t expect the Aussie dollar to fall any further

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A tsunami of currency depreciation is set to be unleashed across the region if Japanese policymakers respond to the recession by printing more money.

Why Japan will never recover

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Japan's huge money-printing program isn't about lifting inflation, it's about trying to avoid a total financial collapse.

A reality check for Australia's economic pessimists

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Policymakers and pessimistic talking heads have long anticipated the Australian economy's demise, but positive news out of the US should prove them wrong.

Why Australia will survive the commodity slump

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The 90 per cent of Australia's economy not based on mining will be glad to see a wealth transfer to households and local business.

Dodgy jobs figures leave us all in the dark

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Due to the controversy surrounding the ABS's employment data, stringing together recent jobs figures into a convincing narrative is becoming more difficult.

Why house prices will keep surging

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Far from falling into an abyss, various factors will drive growth in the residential property market.

Can the housing market celebrate the death of macro-pru?

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Despite calls for macro-prudential policies to cool the property market, recent signals show regulators are more likely to take modest steps within the existing framework.

On the brink of monetary catastrophe

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The US has run lazy fiscal and monetary policy for too long. Action from developed nations to restore monetary discipline is urgently needed to prevent a calamity.

Woe and despair, but China's not broken

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China's lower GDP print taps into one of Australia's greatest national fears. But despair over the figures is misplaced.

Inflation, not deflation, is still the risk

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While the popular narrative is that we're sinking into a deflationary era, quite the opposite is true. Asset inflation is not being taken into account.

Markets see through the central banks' bluff

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At the first sign of trouble, it's likely that central banks will fire up the printing presses once again, prolonging ultra-low rates – and markets know it.

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