Adam Carr

Adam Carr is a leading economist in the Australian market. In addition to being a columnist with Eureka Report, he has worked with some of the world’s largest investment banks and financial intermediaries. Adam was also formerly an economic adviser with the Prime Minister's Department and Commonwealth Treasury.

Why Europe is not Japan

Europe's problems are tiny in comparison to those of Japan. The region is not about to enter a 'lost decade'.

Don’t expect the Aussie dollar to fall any further

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A tsunami of currency depreciation is set to be unleashed across the region if Japanese policymakers respond to the recession by printing more money.

Why Japan will never recover

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Japan's huge money-printing program isn't about lifting inflation, it's about trying to avoid a total financial collapse.

A reality check for Australia's economic pessimists

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Policymakers and pessimistic talking heads have long anticipated the Australian economy's demise, but positive news out of the US should prove them wrong.

Why Australia will survive the commodity slump

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The 90 per cent of Australia's economy not based on mining will be glad to see a wealth transfer to households and local business.

Dodgy jobs figures leave us all in the dark

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Due to the controversy surrounding the ABS's employment data, stringing together recent jobs figures into a convincing narrative is becoming more difficult.

Why house prices will keep surging

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Far from falling into an abyss, various factors will drive growth in the residential property market.

Can the housing market celebrate the death of macro-pru?

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Despite calls for macro-prudential policies to cool the property market, recent signals show regulators are more likely to take modest steps within the existing framework.

On the brink of monetary catastrophe

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The US has run lazy fiscal and monetary policy for too long. Action from developed nations to restore monetary discipline is urgently needed to prevent a calamity.

Woe and despair, but China's not broken

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China's lower GDP print taps into one of Australia's greatest national fears. But despair over the figures is misplaced.

Inflation, not deflation, is still the risk

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While the popular narrative is that we're sinking into a deflationary era, quite the opposite is true. Asset inflation is not being taken into account.

Markets see through the central banks' bluff

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At the first sign of trouble, it's likely that central banks will fire up the printing presses once again, prolonging ultra-low rates – and markets know it.

How long can the equity rout continue?

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There are several reasons why Australian stocks look set to turn around and follow the local currency higher.

ABS accuracy is all in the mind

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Increasingly the health of the domestic economy is whatever you think it is -- literally.

The AUD is already looking over-sold

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Just about everyone thinks the dollar is headed lower, but don't be too sure. On the economics alone, it's already looking cheap.

The RBA's property argument is full of holes

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The RBA looks to have sensibly ruled out higher loan-to-value ratios to slow house price growth, but its current proposal is still flawed simply because there’s no justification for taking any action at all.

How much damage will the US dollar do?

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A surging greenback will likely see increasing market volatility around the globe, but in Australia we could also see the broader economy take a sizeable hit.

Why investors are losing faith in Australia

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The US, UK and New Zealand are surging ahead while we in Australia continue to obsess over the perpetual downturn.

Why the RBA's macroprudential move will fail

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The great flaw in the macroprudential view of the world is that it confuses short-term speculative demand with prudent, long-term property investment.

The IMF's policy prescriptions are wrong for Australia

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While Australia's policymakers fret over changes in the rate of inflation, there's a deeper problem that will trouble the economy.

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