Adam Carr

Adam Carr is a leading economist in the Australian market. In addition to being a columnist with Eureka Report, he has worked with some of the world’s largest investment banks and financial intermediaries. Adam was also formerly an economic adviser with the Prime Minister's Department and Commonwealth Treasury.

Will the ECB’s bazooka lift stocks?

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The ECB's QE program is yet another policy designed to provide liquidity to the European economy. But liquidity isn't the problem.

Australia's record jobs growth is a game-changer

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The numbers confirm the underlying economy is growing at a solid clip, but will it sway the Reserve Bank's stance on a rate cut?

Sizing up China's true influence on the economy

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Economic growth in the US matters much more to Australia's prospects than a slowdown in China. Here's why.

Does the RBA really need to cut rates?

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Slumping crude oil and petrol prices are unleashing the largest economic stimulus seen since the GFC -- and the Reserve Bank hasn't yet lifted a finger.

Government bonds are far too risky for retail investors

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Government bonds have traditionally been considered risk-free investments, but retail investors have many reasons to be wary.

Could rate hikes derail the US economy?

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The US economy is booming, but there are concerns that the Fed's tightening of its monetary policy could spook markets and take the recovery off course.

A boon for Australian banks

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2014 was a year of mixed fortunes for the big four, but a rebound in credit growth could see them more willing to spend and invest in the coming year.

Could Greece spark a new European crisis?

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As a snap election looms in Greece, political uncertainty is sparking fears of a Grexit. But fears of another crisis are overblown.

Is the lower dollar doing Australia any good?

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The push for a weaker dollar has had little impact on industries such as tourism, education and manufacturing, yet it has completely hijacked monetary policy.

Will the Grinch steal Christmas?

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The data suggests Australian consumers are a fragile bunch. Look closer and you'll see a different story emerge.

Unmasking the 'income recession' myth

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Despite the declarations of a so-called income recession, Australian household incomes and wealth have hit new records.

Could the Aussie dollar really hit 75 US cents?

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At 81.5 cents, the dollar already looks pretty cheap to global investors hungry for yield. It might eventually slide towards the RBA's target, but it's uncertain if it will stay there.

The Fed’s rates feint will spur stocks in 2015

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The money is on at least one US rate rise next year, but low inflation should price out a rate hike and spur a surge in equity markets.

The government must not shy away from fiscal repair

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The real issue plaguing the government isn't a decline in the terms of trade -- it's an unsustainable addiction to spending.

Rate cuts would send the wrong message

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A drop in consumer sentiment and a rise in the unemployment rate has fuelled Australia's economic pessimists, but there's more to the data than meets the eye.

Murray has got it wrong on bank capital

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Despite the noble rhetoric surrounding recommendations on bank capital, the Murray inquiry has failed to make a convincing case for change.

The great Australian lie

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Talk of an income recession is quite simply misguided. The bottom line is underlying economic growth is probably still rising at an above trend pace.

The RBA’s rates policy can’t hold for much longer

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The economy is either going into a downturn or a decent upswing, and a policy response will be needed soon.

How to read the US bond market's mixed signals

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Falling US bond yields have sparked talk of a slowdown in US growth, but there are several reasons why this view is misguided.

Will central banks help or harm us?

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The consequences of prolonging ultra-low interest rates to fend off the threat of deflation could be more harmful than deflation itself.

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