Alan Kohler

Alan Kohler is one of Australia’s most experienced business commentators. Alan has been a trusted source of investment advice to Australians for many years, and in 2005 he founded Eureka Report - Australia’s #1 online investment report. Along with Robert Gottliebsen and Stephen Bartholomeusz, Alan also founded Business Spectator, the popular business news and commentary website. Alan is the regular finance presenter on the ABC News and producer of the popular nightly graph (or two).

Why the oil price crashed last night

0 Comments
As Iran inches closer to a deal that could end 35 years of sanctions, the oil price has taken a hammering.

Germany and the ECB must now rescue Greece

0 Comments
The credibility of the IMF, the ECB and eurozone is now in tatters. If they maintain a hard line, the foundations of the EU will be dramatically undermined.

Whatever happens to Greece, the euro is unsustainable

0 Comments
Without greater fiscal and political union, the eurozone will just keep stumbling from crisis to crisis.

Kohler Quizzes: Rhinomed

0 Comments
Watch: Alan Kohler interviews Michael Johnson, CEO of medical technology group Rhinomed about its innovative respiratory devices.

The internet is killing monetary policy

0 Comments
In 2008, the GFC had an irrevocable impact on markets, but another event has been just as instrumental in reshaping the global economy.

Greece is a thriller, but China is a horror show

0 Comments
As China's economy continues to stutter, a dual shake-out of its stockmarket and housing market appears a likely prospect.

A tax for our housing bubble trouble

0 Comments
Amid an overheated housing market, a 19th-century economist's dream of a land tax is making a comeback.

Greece: humiliated, but still in

0 Comments
At heart, the battle to keep Greece in the eurozone is all about currency wars.

Kohler quizzes: Lifestyle Communities

0 Comments
Watch: Alan Kohler speaks to Lifestyle Communities managing director James Kelly about the group's model of affordable retirement villages.

Will SA spark the death of stamp duty?

0 Comments
The SA Government's decision to abolish stamp duty could see a wave of state governments follow suit.

Political dysfunction is taking its toll on our infrastructure

0 Comments
Improving Australia's roads and railways would give national productivity a much-needed boost, but politics keeps getting in the way.

Cinema: Not Apocalypse Now, it’s a Wonderful Life

0 Comments
Many predicted downloads would be the death of cinema, but one family has shown that the movie-going experience is as compelling as ever.

A Grexit looks more and more likely

0 Comments
The likelihood of Greece and Europe striking a deal appears increasingly remote, with both parties now realising that the alternative is no longer so disastrous.

If it's a bubble, houses won't be unaffordable for long

0 Comments
Regardless of whether property prices are in a bubble or not, it's clear that housing has become too expensive for the national good.

Is the era of mass marketing over?

0 Comments
Free-to-air TV networks have long made the business case that no other medium can do mass marketing like they can, but those days may be drawing to a close.

Send in the clowns - don't bother, they're here

0 Comments
Joe Hockey reckons the increase in seasonally adjusted GDP points to the economy's broad-based momentum, but that's wishful thinking.

P2P lenders need to be tested by a recession

0 Comments
Innovative and disruptive financial intermediaries won’t be trusted until they’ve had a chance to prove their mettle during an economic downturn.

Kohler quizzes: Australian Dairy Farms

0 Comments
Watch: Alan Kohler speaks to Australian Dairy Farms director Adrian Rowley after the group's recent share market listing.

House prices: it's about wages

0 Comments
With little prospect of real wages declining, Australia needs to get the exchange rate down to become competitive again. And that means more rate cuts.

Tesla's revolution won't win overnight

0 Comments
Watch: It's clear that battery technology will overhaul both the energy and automobile industries, but the colossal inertia in place means these changes won't arrive soon.

Pages